Publication

Honourable Maryam Monsef
President of the Queen’s Privy Council for Canada
Minister of Democratic Institutions


Table of Contents

Minister’s Message

The Honourable Maryam MonsefAs President of the Queen’s Privy Council for Canada, I am pleased to table the Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat’s (CICS) 2015-16 Departmental Performance Report.

Since its creation in 1973, the Secretariat has worked diligently to provide the administrative support services required for the planning and conduct of federal-provincial-territorial and provincial-territorial conferences of First Ministers, Ministers and Deputy Ministers across Canada.

In this context, the agency continues to play a key and pivotal role in the domain of intergovernmental machinery in Canada by providing impartial senior level conference services to federal, provincial and territorial governments.

In fiscal year 2015-16, CICS provided its services to 114 senior-level intergovernmental conferences, including a First Ministers’ Meeting held in March 2016. Of these meetings, there were 72 face-to-face, 40 teleconferences and two virtual conferences. While the number of face-to-face meetings essentially remained unchanged from the previous year, the numbers of teleconferences and videoconferences each doubled, indicating a definite interest in these technologies as a viable, cost- and time-effective way for governments to confer.

Going forward, CICS will continue to adapt its service delivery model so that it remains client-focused and responsive to the current environment.

The Honourable Maryam Monsef
President of the Queen’s Privy Council for Canada
Minister of Democratic Institutions

Results Highlights

What funds were used?

5,270,551

Actual Spending

Who was involved?

31

Actual FTEs

Results Highlights

  • CICS provided its services to 114 senior-level intergovernmental conferences, a 20% increase over the previous year’s total.  This included 72 face-to-face meetings, 40 teleconferences and two virtual conferences.
  • The teleconference support services with 3-line simultaneous interpretation, introduced as a new service in 2013-14, has continued to show significant increase in popularity with clients. Support was provided to 40 teleconferences in 2015-16 at both the Ministers and Deputy Ministers’ levels, or double the number from the previous year.  There is no doubt that this technology will continue to be utilized as a responsive and very cost- and time-efficient alternative to face-to-face meetings.
  • Client satisfaction levels continued to be very high. For conference delegates, our target of 90% satisfaction was met while with conference planners, the target was exceeded with a satisfaction rate of 92.5%. The words professional, efficient and organized were used most often by planners and delegates alike to describe the quality of services provided by CICS in support of intergovernmental meetings.

Section I: Organizational Overview

Organizational Profile

Appropriate Minister: Honourable Maryam Monsef

Institutional Head: André M. McArdle, Secretary

Ministerial Portfolio: President of the Queen’s Privy Council for Canada; Minister of Democratic Institutions

Enabling Instrument: The Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat was established pursuant to an agreement reached at the May 1973 First Ministers’ Conference and was designated a department of the federal government by an Order-in-Council dated November 29, 1973.

Year of Incorporation / Commencement: 1973

Organizational Context

Raison d’être

The President of the Queen’s Privy Council for Canada is responsible for this organization. The Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat (CICS), established pursuant to an agreement reached at the May 1973 First Ministers’ Conference, is an agency of the federal, provincial and territorial governments. Its mandate is to provide administrative support and planning services for intergovernmental conferences of First Ministers, Ministers and Deputy Ministers.

These intergovernmental conferences are a key instrument for consultation and negotiation among the different orders of governments and assist in the development of national and/or provincial/territorial policies. They are a critical component of the workings of the Canadian federation and represent a core principle of our democratic society.

By skillfully executing the logistical planning and delivery of these meetings, CICS not only relieves governments of the administrative process burden but also allows them to greatly benefit from significant cost efficiencies and economies of scale.

Responsibilities

The mandate of the Secretariat is to support federal, provincial and territorial governments in the planning and conduct of senior level intergovernmental conferences held across Canada. The primary objective of CICS is to relieve client departments of the numerous technical and administrative tasks associated with the planning and conduct of multilateral conferences, thereby enabling participants to concentrate on substantive intergovernmental policy issues. CICS provides continuous, effective, impartial administrative services to these meetings.

Benefits for Canadians

The planning and conduct of multilateral meetings of First Ministers, Ministers and Deputy Ministers is a critical component of the workings of the Canadian federation. By skillfully and professionally planning and delivering services at these meetings, CICS allows governments to discuss important issues without getting distracted by process. The risk of error and omission is significantly mitigated by tapping into the Secretariat’s experience and impartiality.

The interests of all Canadians are represented by their elected governments participating in these intergovernmental conferences.

As an institution dedicated to supporting events that give rise to, and support the spirit of cooperation and negotiation among governments, CICS seeks to execute its role to maximum effect, producing an environment conducive to rational discourse and optimal decision-making, to the benefit of all Canadians.

Federal, provincial and territorial governments greatly benefit from significant cost efficiencies and economies of scale through the use of CICS. This is particularly relevant in the current fiscal environment.

Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture

CICS is a micro agency with a single program mandate. Its Program Activity Architecture is presented below.

1. Strategic Outcome: Senior-level intergovernmental conference services are professionally and successfully delivered.

1.1 Program: Conference Services

Internal Services

Operating Environment and Risk Analysis

The current challenges facing the Secretariat consist of managing a number of key personnel departures, maintaining an appropriate arm’s length relationship with Central Agencies and fulfilling the increasing requirements of Central Agencies.

The Secretariat’s program and service delivery model continues to evolve to meet stakeholder needs and expectations. Even though intergovernmental meetings are on the rise, it continues to be a time of fiscal restraint for our federal, provincial and territorial partners. The integration of new technologies and the expansion of services has allowed for increased collaboration and offered more flexibility to clients.

The agency’s mandate and sole program is to manage senior level intergovernmental conference activities undertaken by federal, provincial and territorial governments and their respective departmental organizations. The Secretariat serves all 14 jurisdictions equally and thus, must ensure that its services remain pertinent, confidential and impartial to all clients.

Key Risks
Risk Risk Response Strategy Link to the Organization’s Programs
Human Resource Management

There is a risk that the organization will be unable to sustain an adequate workforce with the appropriate competencies due to a large turnover of staff (retirements & departures, provincial-territorial secondment rotations, peak period staffing) and the outcome of current labour negotiations, resulting in potential errors, client dissatisfaction, and loss of confidence in the organization.

This risk was identified in the 2015-16 RPP and continues to be a key risk because in a micro-agency, the departure of one employee has an impact on the organization.

In 2015-16, CICS successfully mitigated the Human Resource Management Risk through the implementation of its Human Resource Plan and Succession Plan for key positions.

Going forward, the same mitigation strategies identified in the 2015-16 RPP will be used and greater importance will be placed on creating pools for key positions and having experienced personnel mentor new employees.

Conference Services;

Internal Services

Governance and strategic direction

There is a risk that the provincial-territorial stakeholders may not perceive CICS as being neutral because of recent federal initiatives which could negatively affect the number of requests for services being requested for provincial-territorial meetings.

This risk was identified in the 2015-16 RPP and continues to be a key risk because CICS must ensure that all 14 jurisdictions recognize its services as being equal, impartial and confidential to all clients.

In 2015-16, CICS successfully mitigated this risk by strengthening provincial/territorial partnerships, respecting the exemptions from the Federal Access to Information and Privacy Act and the Federal Identity Program. Discussions with key players around the impacts of other transformation initiatives will be ongoing.

Conference Services
Financial Management

There is a risk that sufficient resources may not be available to maintain quality service levels for client groups because of rising operational costs, fiscal restraints and increased stakeholder expectations.

This risk was identified in the 2015-16 RPP and was successfully mitigated through rigorous forecasting, effective budgeting and stronger internal controls.

As a result of these measures, the Financial Management Risk has been reduced to an acceptable level and is no longer ranked as a key risk in our Risk Management Plan.

Conference Services;

Internal Services

Organizational Priorities

Priority: Enhance and expand strategic partnerships

Description

In order for CICS to successfully deliver its strategic outcome, the agency must be recognized among all governments as providing an essential service in the process of intergovernmental collaboration. Through improved dialogue and greater collaboration with our partners and our clients, this priority will help maintain our existing clientele, increase the Secretariat’s visibility among potential partners and offer opportunities for increased understanding of the unique and constructive role played by the Secretariat.

Priority Type

Ongoing

Key Supporting Initiatives
Planned Initiatives Start Date End Date Status Link to the Organization’s Programs
Seek opportunities through effective use of Small Department and Agency (SDA) networks and direct contacts. April 2015 To be determined On track Conference Services
Enhance dialogue with the provinces and territories. April 2015 To be determined On track Conference Services
Work with intergovernmental sectors in order to provide leadership to horizontal sharing of information and best practices. April 2015 To be determined On track Conference Services
Progress Toward the Priority
  • Key members of the Executive Committee actively participate in a number of Small Department and Agency networks to be engaged in Central Agency initiatives at the earliest stages in order to provide important input concerning our neutrality at the onset.
  • The Knowledge Exchange Forum on FPT meeting logistics, created by CICS in 2013 and held again in November 2014, did not take place in fall 2015, due to very high conference activity and actual or imminent staff retirements. This activity will resume in 2016-17, as it provides us and our contacts from across federal government departments with an opportunity to exchange valuable information, network and share best practices surrounding the organization of senior level FPT meetings.
  • CICS continues to refine its strategies to ensure the effective marketing of its services available to federal, provincial and territorial governments. Following a recommendation from last year’s evaluation report, greater emphasis was placed in this fiscal year on marketing the CICS website to conference planners. These efforts will be carried into next fiscal year through a re-design of the site and better promotion.

Priority: Transform our service delivery model

Description

This priority will ensure continuous improvement in the service delivery model by aligning people, processes and technologies to reflect the current environment, the demands of the future and the changing needs of clients. It will also allow for the achievement of greater efficiencies.

Priority Type

Ongoing

Key Supporting Initiatives
Planned Initiatives Start Date End Date Status Link to the Organization’s Programs
Deliver virtual conferences April 2015 March 2016 Completed Conference Services
Integrate and enhance technologies into service delivery processes and day-to-day operations April 2015 March 2016 Completed Conference Services
Create internal committees to review CICS service delivery model to identify potential savings and efficiencies April 2015 March 2016 Completed Conference Services
Involve clients in the determination of service improvements April 2015 March 2016 Completed Conference Services
Efficient information management of conference records April 2015 March 2016 Completed Conference Services
Review and develop training strategies for successful integration of new employees April 2015 March 2016 Completed Conference Services
Progress Toward the Priority
  • The great success of CICS’ full-service support to a videoconference of FPT Ministers of Labour was replicated with the same group in February 2016, while a virtual conference of the Canadian Council of Ministers of Environment successfully took place in November 2015. Adoption of videoconferencing technology has been slower than expected by client sectors who have preferred teleconferencing, as evidenced by the doubling of this type of meeting in 2015-16 over the previous year. Teleconferences have proven simpler to manage and to participate in (not requiring the use of specialized studios by participants) while also requiring less lead time to organize. CICS has tested at-desk technologies that should make videoconferencing more accessible and favorably perceived by clients in the future. These technologies will also be actively promoted with conference planners and other CICS clients.
  • The teleconference support services with 3-line simultaneous interpretation, introduced as a new service by CICS in 2013-14, has continued to show significant increase in popularity with CICS clients. Support was provided to 40 teleconferences in 2015-16 at both the Ministers and Deputy Ministers’ levels, or double the number from the previous year. There is no doubt that this technology will continue to be utilized as a responsive and very cost- and time-efficient alternative to face-to-face meetings.
  • Mobile internet hubs tested in spring 2015 and now used on almost all conference sites have proven very cost effective to offer a dedicated, better quality internet service to delegates.
  • The capabilities of the on-line registration portal and the secure document retrieval site have been enhanced, based in part on client feedback, and are now fully implemented. On-line registration has proven useful to meeting planners (host governments) to gauge interest in, and plan for delegates’ participation in the various components of more elaborate conference program. In the past, this often required that delegates register separately with CICS (for the meeting itself) and with the host government (for various other conference program components), something that many delegates found unnecessarily time-consuming.
  • The services and expertise provided by CICS in support of teleconferences in particular (including interpretation services) are greatly valued by conference planners as well as participants. Now that at-desk technologies have been fully tested and implemented by CICS, clients will also rely on us to guide and support them to adopt these more convenient options for virtual conferencing.
  • The ongoing work of an internal Technology Committee, created in 2014-15, continues to be a critical element in developing and reviewing new technologies that enable CICS to enhance services while lowering costs where appropriate.
  • A delegate’s survey conducted on site or online in relation to most meetings served by CICS continues to provide valuable and very timely feedback on all facets of the administrative and technical support we provide. A similar survey is conducted annually with conference planners, also yielding important feedback for the organization. In turn, the insight gained from both surveys informs the organization’s decisions about the alignment of its services and approaches with clients’ evolving needs and priorities.
  • All archiving of conference records are now done electronically.
  • Conference Services management met with six new employees in September 2015 to gather feedback and suggestions regarding job satisfaction to date, especially vis-à-vis integration to CICS. Discussion topics ranged from the effectiveness of activities already in place to welcome new personnel to some of the challenges associated with understanding and learning one’s new job, as well as reflections on best practices and possible improvements. Overall, the feedback received was very positive and ranged from orientation documentation provided, job shadowing, and experienced colleagues’ support and guidance. Improvements required focussed largely on the finer technical details of conference logistics and training on some of the software and systems used by employees.

Priority: Review and adapt management practices to increase efficiencies

Description

In light of the current economic environment, CICS is continuing to focus on shared services solutions, technology enhancements and cost efficiencies. This priority will ensure transparency and accountability and contribute to achieving excellence in management practices, resulting in effective and efficient use of resources in support of CICS’s strategic outcome.

Priority Type

Ongoing

Key Supporting Initiatives
Planned Initiatives Start Date End Date Status Link to the Organization’s Programs
Review and/or renegotiate shared-services agreements with other organizations for integrated service delivery April 2015 September 2016 Completed Conference Services; Internal Services
Review the program evaluation strategy and develop new assessment tools as required April 2015 To be determined On track Conference Services
Develop a risk management framework April 2015 March 2016 Completed Conference Services; Internal Services
Develop an internal control management framework April 2015 March 2017 On track Conference Services; Internal Services
Implement common HR and financial management business processes and practices April 2015 March 2017 On track Conference Services; Internal Services
Progress Toward the Priority
  • All shared services agreements have been renegotiated with other organizations for integrated service delivery. This is in line with the government’s policy on internal service agreements. This was part of our management action plan subsequent to an audit on internal shared services agreements by the Office of the Comptroller General.
  • A risk management framework has been developed and received approval from the executive committee early in 2016-2017.
  • The development of an internal control management framework began during the 2015-2016 fiscal period. CICS retained the services of an outside consultant experienced in internal controls to review its existing internal control management framework. There were no major issues identified, however some recommendations were made for improvement. The Secretariat is on track to put in place the majority of those recommendations.

Priority: Continue to build a capable, confident and high performing workforce

Description

The agency’s greatest asset remains its personnel. This priority will seek ways to empower and motivate employees, build internal capacity, and provide flexible means of working in order to foster a culture of continual improvement and innovation.

Priority Type

Ongoing

Key Supporting Initiatives
Planned Initiatives Start Date End Date Status Link to the Organization’s Programs
Continue to provide training and development opportunities for all employees April 2015 March 2017 On track Conference Services; Internal Services
Implement the new Performance Management Directive April 2015 March 2016 Completed Conference Services; Internal Services
Continue to improve internal communication processes and tools April 2015 To be determined On track Conference Services; Internal Services
Progress Toward the Priority
  • Progress has been made to develop cohesive training and development plans for all personnel. A tracking system has been developed to track and report upon continuous learning undertaken at all levels of the Secretariat.
  • The Performance Management Directive was successfully implemented at CICS in 2014-15. Employees at all levels worked together to adopt the new system – objectives were established, discussions were held, feedback was provided and reporting was completed.
  • CICS continues to promote open and ongoing internal communications by:
    • Sharing weekly Executive Committee Meeting minutes with employees;
    • Circulating monthly newsletters from the Secretary;
    • Convening all-staff meetings on a regular basis; and
    • Reviewing employee suggestions at Executive Committee Meetings and communicating decisions back to all-staff

For more information on organizational priorities, see the Minister’s mandate letter.i

Section II: Expenditure Overview

Actual Expenditures

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Main Estimates
2015–16
Planned Spending
2015–16
Total Authorities
Available for Use
2015–16
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
Difference
(actual minus planned)
5,967,541 5,967,541 6,141,668 5,270,551 (696,990)
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents [FTEs])
2015–16
Planned
2015–16
Actual
2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
32 31 -1

Budgetary Performance Summary

Budgetary Performance Summary for Program and Internal Services (dollars)
Program and Internal Services 2015–16
Main Estimates
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
2015–16 Total Authorities Available for Use 2015–16
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2014–15
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2013–14
Actual Spending (authorities used)
Conference Services 4,141,822 4,141,822 4,140,073 4,140,073 4,315,949 3,561,128 3,508,894 3,800,944
Internal Services 1,825,719 1,825,719 1,824,948 1,824,948 1,825,719 1,709,423 1,660,593 2,063,937
Total 5,967,541 5,967,541 5,965,021 5,965,021 6,141,668 5,270,551 5,169,487 5,864,881

It is important to note that CICS does not convene intergovernmental meetings. The Secretariat responds to decisions taken by governments to meet on key national or specific issues. The location, number, timing and duration of meeting are factors that are beyond the control of the Secretariat. CICS does exercise due care and probity in the expenditure of its funds to meet its mandate.

Departmental Spending Trend

Departmental spending trend graph
The Secretariat is funded at a level sufficient to finance 100 in person conferences annually. An event can consist of one or more conferences and is used to plan the budget for each of the conferences in terms of transportation and communication, rentals, translation and interpretation services. Over the past three years, there has been a gradual increase in conference activity.

The increase in spending results from expenditures incurred for the First Ministers Meeting held in March 2016. This was offset by the decrease in costs related to 40 teleconferences (2014-15:19 teleconferences) and 2 virtual conferences (2015-16:1 virtual conference). Since jurisdictions participate remotely by video or telephone, these types of meetings significantly reduce costs for CICS that are associated with professional and special services. This trend is expected to continue.

Expenditures by Vote

For information on the Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat’s organizational voted and statutory expenditures, consult the Public Accounts of Canada 2016.ii

Alignment of Spending With the Whole-of-Government Framework

Alignment of 2015-16 Actual Spending With the Whole-of-Government Frameworkiii (dollars)
Program Spending Area Government of Canada Outcome Planned Spending 2015–16 Actual Spending
Conference Services Government affairs Well-managed and efficient government operations 4,141,822 3,561,128

Financial Statements and Financial Statements Highlights

Financial Statements Highlights

Condensed Statement of Operations (unaudited)
For the Year Ended March 31, 2016 (dollars)
Financial Information 2015–16
Planned
Results
2015–16
Actual
2014–15
Actual
Difference (2015–16 actual minus 2015–16 planned) Difference (2015–16 actual minus 2014–15 actual)
Total expenses 6,685,697 5,845,908 5,860,217 (839,789) (14,309)
Total revenues
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 6,685,697 5,845,908 5,860,217 (839,789) (14,309)

Total expenses were approximately $5.9 million, similar to the previous year’s expenses. The savings resulting from an increased number of teleconferences and virtual conferences were somewhat offset by costs related to a First Ministers’ Meeting. Since jurisdictions participate remotely by video or telephone, these types of meetings significantly reduce costs for CICS that are associated with professional and special services. This trend is expected to continue. It should be noted that expenses are recorded on an accrual basis in the Financial Statements and include charges paid on our behalf by other government departments.

Condensed Statement of Financial Position (unaudited)
As at March 31, 2016 (dollars)
Financial Information 2015–16 2014–15 Difference
(2015–16 minus
2014–15)
Total net liabilities 903,036 740,847 162,189
Total net financial assets 658,907 517,232 141,675
Departmental net debt 244,129 223,616 20,513
Total non-financial assets 116,723 142,644 (25,921)
Departmental net financial position (127,406) (80,971) (46,435)

Total liabilities were approximately $900 thousand, an increase of some $162 thousand (22%) over the previous year. Accounts payable and accrued liabilities make up the largest component representing 73% of total liabilities. The increase is mainly due to an increase in accounts payable to support normal operations including accrued salary and wages. The liabilities consist of accounts payable to external parties ($658 thousand), vacation pay and compensatory leave ($103 thousand) as well as employee future benefits ($142 thousand)

Total net financial assets were approximately $660 thousand as at March 31, 2016, an increase of some $140 thousand (27%) over the previous year. The increase is mainly due to an increase in the amount due from the Consolidated Revenue Fund by some $125 thousand and an increase in receivables from other government departments and agencies. Amounts due from the Consolidated Revenue Fund represent a charge against departmental authorities and are available for use to the organization without further authorities.

Section III: Analysis of Program and Internal Services

Program: Conference Services

Description

Provision of expert, impartial support services for the planning and conduct of First Ministers, Ministers and Deputy Ministers level federal-provincial-territorial and provincial-territorial conferences.

The CICS does not convene intergovernmental meetings. It is called upon to respond to decisions taken by governments to meet on key issues. Decisions concerning the location of such meetings, their number in a given fiscal year, their timing and duration, are all factors, beyond the control of the Secretariat. The level of CICS expenditures for each fiscal year is, however, directly affected by these factors.

Program Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2015-16, CICS provided its services to 114 senior-level intergovernmental conferences, a 20% increase over the previous year’s total. This included 72 face-to-face meetings, 40 teleconferences and two virtual conferences. While the number of face-to-face meetings essentially remained unchanged from the previous year, the numbers of teleconferences and videoconferences each doubled, indicating a definite interest in these technologies (especially teleconferencing) as a viable, cost- and time-effective way for governments to confer. It is interesting to note that nearly two thirds of the 41 teleconferences and videoconferences took place in the second half of the fiscal year.

Performance is assessed using internal data and documents as well as two surveys of clients; one an annual sampling of conference planners and the second of conference delegates who attend the events.

Overall, client satisfaction levels continue to be very high. For conference delegates, our target of 90% satisfaction was met while with conference planners, the target was exceeded with a satisfaction rate of 92.5%. The words professional, efficient and organized were used most often by planners and delegates alike to describe the quality of services provided by CICS in support of intergovernmental meetings.

There was a marked increase in the degree of satisfaction of meeting planners regarding our ability to identify protocol as well as conference media coverage requirements and to recommend options to address these requirements. Getting planners to visit the CICS website for service information remains a challenge which we hope to address in the coming year through a re-design of the site and better promotion.

Flexibility and adaptability must continue to be a main focus for the organization, to ensure that we continue to be nimble and to adjust quickly to changing client needs and requests during the planning and conduct of conferences. However, this must continue to be balanced with the need to deliver our services in the most cost effective way possible.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Main Estimates
2015–16
Planned Spending
2015–16
Total Authorities Available for Use
2015–16
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2015–16
Difference (actual minus planned)
4,141,822 4,141,822 4,315,949 3,561,128 (580,694)
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents [FTEs])
2015–16
Planned
2015–16
Actual
2015–16
Difference (actual minus planned)
23 22 -1
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Professionally planned and supported conferences, including effectively addressing unforeseen challenges. Client satisfaction levels for the full range of CICS services provided in support of PT and FPT conferences. 90% or higher positive response rate. 92.5%
Clients’ and conference participants’ conference needs identified and addressed accordingly. Client satisfaction levels for the full range of CICS services provided in support of PT and FPT conferences. 90% or higher positive response rate. 90.4%

Internal Services

Description

Internal services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. Internal services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization, and not those provided to a specific program. The groups of activities are Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; and Acquisition Services.

Program Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Internal services has met its targets set in the 2015-16 Report on Plans and Priorities. The actual expenditures for Internal Services were some $115 thousand lower than planned. This is primarily the result of lower expenses for professional and special services, transportation and communication as well as lower information expenditures.

CICS has renegotiated its shared services agreement during 2015-16 for the procurement of human resources and financial services without any increase in costs. These service agreements are reviewed annually to ensure that they still deliver cost efficiencies.

Reports to central agencies were compliant with requirements and submitted on time.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Main Estimates
2015–16
Planned Spending
2015–16
Total Authorities
Available for Use
2015–16
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
1,825,719 1,825,719 1,825,719 1,709,423 (116,296)
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16
Planned
2015–16
Actual
2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
9 9

Section IV: Supplementary Information

Supplementary Information Tables

The following supplementary information tables are available on the Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat’s websitev.

Federal Tax Expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures annually in the Report of Federal Tax Expenditures .viii This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to related federal spending programs. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational Contact Information

Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat

Mailing Address 
P.O. Box 488, Station ‘A’
Ottawa, Ontario
K1N 8V5

Location
222 Queen St., 10th Floor
Ottawa, Ontario
K1P 5V9

General Inquiries: 613-995-2341
Fax: 613-996-6091
E-mail: Info@scics.gc.ca

Appendix: Definitions

appropriation (crédit): Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires): Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.

Departmental Performance Report (rapport ministériel sur le rendement): Reports on an appropriated organization’s actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Reports on Plans and Priorities. These reports are tabled in Parliament in the fall.

full-time equivalent (équivalent temps plein): A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.

Government of Canada outcomes (résultats du gouvernement du Canada): A set of 16 high-level objectives defined for the government as a whole, grouped in four spending areas: economic affairs, social affairs, international affairs and government affairs.

Management, Resources and Results Structure (Structure de la gestion, des ressources et des résultats): A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization’s inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.

non-budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires): Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.

performance (rendement): What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.

performance indicator (indicateur de rendement): A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.

performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement): The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.

planned spending (dépenses prévues): For Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPPs) and Departmental Performance Reports (DPRs), planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their RPPs and DPRs.

plans (plan): The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.

priorities (priorité): Plans or projects that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s).

program (programme): A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.

Program Alignment Architecture (architecture d’alignement des programmes): A structured inventory of an organization’s programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.

Report on Plans and Priorities (rapport sur les plans et les priorités): Provides information on the plans and expected performance of appropriated organizations over a three-year period. These reports are tabled in Parliament each spring.

results (résultat): An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.

statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives): Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.

Strategic Outcome (résultat stratégique): A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization’s mandate, vision and core functions.

sunset program (programme temporisé): A time-limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.

target (cible): A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.

voted expenditures (dépenses votées): Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.

Whole-of-government framework (cadre pangouvernemental): Maps the financial contributions of federal organizations receiving appropriations by aligning their Programs to a set of 16 government-wide, high-level outcome areas, grouped under four spending areas.


Endnotes

i Minister’s mandate letter

ii Public Accounts of Canada 2016

iii Whole-of-Government Framework

vi Financial Statements

v Supplementary Information Tables

vi Greening Government Operations

vii Internal Audits and Evaluations

vii Report of Federal Tax Expenditures